British Slang

London Street Scene

Winston Churchill once famously said that the United States and Great Britain are two countries separated by a common language. In that vein, I offer up the following paragraph, with a handful of British slang words embedded. I should also note that this paragraph also demonstrates my first use of footnotes. This is done using a facility called mark down. Doing this was an interesting exercise and actually was the whole point of this blog post.

I was in the pub last night and there this scouser1, who was already quite legless2. He had spent all his quid by then and was completely skint3 by then. I called this bloke a taxi and when it came, I tried to help him into the backseat. Instead, he ran around the vehicle and climbed in the front passenger seat, while shouting “bagsy4“. As he pulled away, he looked quite chuffed5.

In other news, Anne scored a snow day of sorts. A broken water main caused the issue of a boil order. At home, we are unaffected, but a large portion of the school district was. So on Sunday, Anne got an email telling her that classes for Monday were cancelled. This was also on the evening news, but at oh-no-dark-thirty Anne got a robo call from her actual employer, Kelly. It was a long message, with multiple phone numbers repeated twice that she had to endure until its end, before being able to opt out of any further such calls for the day.

The news is now saying that the boil order may remain in place for two to three days. Does anyone want to bet that Anne gets another call tomorrow? So what should we do with this unexpected bounty? What to do? What to do?


  1. Someone from Liverpool. 
  2. Drunk. 
  3. Broke. 
  4. The same as calling shotgun. 
  5. Pleased or delighted. 

4 thoughts on “British Slang

  1. I got a call just before noon this morning saying the boil order had ended, that they had tested the water and it was okay now. Didn’t matter – it didn’t affect me anyway.

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